In Search of Brevity

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Have you ever sat through a meeting, or a conference call, or a presentation, and thought to yourself… “Oh my god… I wish this person would get to the point…“? Yeah. Me too. Many, many times. We all know what it feels like to have our time wasted by someone who just won’t, or can’t, get to the point.

Have you ever sat through a meeting or presentation and watched nearly everyone in the room, especially the most senior people, immediately flip to the last page in the deck? Yeah. Me too. Why do people do this? Because they want to know what the point is. And most of us suffer from a chronic inability to make our point quickly. Somewhere along the way, we all read the same book that taught us to try to keep our business audience in suspense for as long as possible.

We’re not writing movie scripts here, people. Your colleagues will not walk out of your next presentation and say “Kyle, that was great. You kept me in suspense right up until the last slide. I had NO idea where you were taking me. It was fantastic!” People will never, ever say that to you.

The point here is that in the 21st century business world, our communication needs clarity AND brevity. We have to make our point clearly AND quickly.

Final question of the day. You all know what it feels like to have someone else waste your time by not getting to the point. Now, the harder question. How often do you think people feel that way when they are listening to you?

Exactly… time to get to work.

Have a great day.

At The Latimer Group, our individual Coaching services are highly customized and designed to help you achieve your specific goals. Typical engagements focus on developing skill sets in Leadership Communications, Public Speaking, and Executive-Level Business Presentations. To learn more, e-mail us at info@TheLatimerGroup.com

Photo by Casey Bisson used under the following license.

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3 Responses to In Search of Brevity

  1. So when it’s your turn do it right. Set a time limit that is brief, make your presentation fit that limit and practice the whole thing before you go in. That may result in some pretty ruthless cutting but if you review it properly you will still make your point. And your audience will appreciate it.

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